Parental Engagement

By Carl J. Petersen

Education issues as seen from a father's eyes.

Granada Hills Charter High School and the Case for a Moratorium

Unable to provide proper oversight over the charters already operating under its authority, the LAUSD considers hitting the pause button.

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The Winners and Losers of the LAUSD Strike

In a School District currently defined by the fight between public education and privatization, both sides put everything on the line. Was it worth it?

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We Interrupt This Strike For a Regularly Scheduled Day Off

What effect is there on students when schools are closed for holidays where most parents have to work?

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Austin Beutner Must Go

As the LAUSD strike drags on it is abundantly clear that the only way to bring an end to the chaos is to fire Superintendent Austin Beutner.

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Who "Taught" Your LAUSD Student Last Week?

Teachers are professionals that are trained to handle the many needs of their students. What about the people taking over during the strike?

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Kids First?

The LAUSD School Board loosens the rule on fingerprinting school volunteers. Have they just set up the next child abuse disaster?

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A Charter School Pawn

The charter industry hides behind children when it comes time to go through the renewal process for their publicly funded private schools.

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Where Do the LAUSD Board Members Stand?

“Privatizing forces have appropriated the language of civil rights and social justice movements, while simultaneously gutting our schools of resources and selling our schools away to corporate-run charter companies.”

- Reclaim Our Schools LA

As noted by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Board members in their joint statement dated August 21, 2018, “students and their families will bear the brunt of a strike action.” Many parents of the hundreds of thousands of students who attend District schools are scrambling to make arrangements for their children knowing that if schools remain open, LAUSD lawyers have admitted that “the health and safety of students” would be threatened and a normal academic program will be impossible to maintain. Students who depend on meals delivered by the schools are especially vulnerable as the district has not stated how these programs would be handled if schools are forced to close.

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Can the LAUSD Ensure Student Safety During a Strike?

In addition to threatening the health and safety of students, a strike would also...

- Exhibit A in LAUSD Court Filing

For over 25 years the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has been unable to satisfy the terms of a Consent Decree meant to ensure that students with special education needs receive the education that they are entitled to by law. Yet when faced with a strike by United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA), the District has suddenly shown a concern “that students with disabilities not be deprived of legally-mandated services.” Therefore, lawyers for the District asked the court to enjoin “UTLA, its officers, and representatives from causing, encouraging, condoning, or participating in any strike, slowdown, or other work stoppage by any UTLA bargaining unit member who provides educational services to LAUSD special education students.

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Lowering Class Size: If Not Now, When?

Whereas, The District is committed to creating the most enriching academic environment for all students, which includes a reduction in class-size;

- LAUSD School Board

On June 18, 2013, the Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD) School Board voted for a resolution that directed their “Superintendent to examine the feasibility of implementing class-size reduction for the 2014-15 academic calendar and to develop a long term, class-size reduction strategy that will yield positive academic results”. In the over five years that have passed since the resolution should have been implemented, the District has had four different Superintendents. The class size ratio has remained exactly the same.

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