Carl Petersen: Why Teachers in Los Angeles Might Strike

"The teachers of Los Angeles have authorized a strike. As you will see in this article by LA parent Carl Petersen, negotiations remain stalled.

The district claims it can’t afford to settle with its teachers. This having raised Board Member salaries by 174% and paying its new superintendent a base salary of $350,000 (supporters of former investment banker Beutner originally said he would take no salary).

One of the richest cities in the nation claims it can’t pay its teachers or provide the services children need. Yet LAUSD managed to find an extra $1 billion for John Deasy’s iPad Fiasco.

Cue the world’s smallest violin.

And this:

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LA charter chief says all students reimbursed after alleged illegal summer school fees

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KNX 1070 Newsradio - June 27, 2018

Transcript:

State education officials have told a public charter school in Sun Valley to stop charging fees for students to attend summer school. Superintendent of the North Valley Military Institute tells the Daily News the fees were required because the school didn't have the budget otherwise. San Fernando Valley education advocate, Carl Petersen, filed a complaint against the school. He tells KNX the fees were wrong:

"This creates a barrier. They serve mainly low-income students. What they are saying is that if you can't afford this, then you don't get the services. That is not what public education is about."

The school's superintendent says the school believes the fees were legal but will listen to state officials and refund the money.

copyright held by KNX.

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LA charter chief believes summer school fees were legal, but plans to pay them back

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LA charter school’s summer program fees are illegal, state says

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California Senate Candidate Alison Hartson on Education

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DA To Review Allegations of Brown Act Violation Against Board Member Scott Schmerelson

SpeakUp.png"The website K-12 News Networks The Wire reported on the recent meeting during which Schmerelson allegedly described details of the Board’s closed-session interview with Beutner during the hiring process.

“In describing Beutner’s conversations with the Board prior to his being hired, Schmerelson states that ‘It was the worst interviews [that] I have ever seen in my entire life. Not one question was answered about education.’ Every time Schmerelson ‘asked a question about education, [Beutner] couldn’t answer because he really didn’t know,’” the site reported.

A video of Schmerelson’s comments that appeared on that site and on changelausd.com [sic] website has been removed, but Melvoin confirmed that he viewed the video before its removal. In a press release issued May 1, Schmerelson also revealed how many and which Board members agreed to enter contract negotiations with Beutner during closed session on April 20."

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Los Angeles: Will Unqualified Superintendent Get In-Service Training?

"The Los Angeles school board selected an unqualified person to lead its schools. The decision was made in secret, with no public input.

Carl Petersen points out that state law requires that Superintendents must have experience as teachers and administrators. There is provision for a waiver. Is the superintendent is unqualified, like Austin Beutner, he may be required to take an in-service training program.

35028.
No person shall be eligible to hold a position as city superintendent, district superintendent, deputy superintendent, associate superintendent, or assistant superintendent of schools unless he is the holder of both a valid school administration certificate and a valid teacher’s certificate, but any person employed as a deputy, associate, or assistant superintendent in a purely clerical capacity shall not be required to hold any certificate.
(Enacted by Stats. 1976, Ch. 1010.)"

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California: Charter School Lobby Insists that “Public Charter Schools” Are Businesses, Not Public Schools

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CHARTERS AND CONSEQUENCES: An Investigative Series by the Network for Public Education

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